Using Sedges as Landscape Plants

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Date/Time
Date(s) - 04/23/2017
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Location
Dole Library

Categories


Not many gardeners are aware of the many types of sedges that are available for use in landscaping. They can provide a great deal of beauty as well as ecological functionality in your landscapes. There’s no need for–at best ecologically useless, at worst ecologically deadly–ground covers like English Ivy or Winter Creeper when you can use sedges that provide nearly the same aesthetic function but have many, many more environmental benefits. 

Carol’s presentation will provide images and descriptions of sedges that would be attractive choices for garden plans.  It will also show the differences between sedges, grasses and rushes.  

Some people find the concept of sedges intimidating or associated with “sedge-heads” with their magnifying glasses (if you don’t understand you will by the end of her talk), but Carol will make sedges completely approachable and newbie-friendly.  Many of the references on sedges focus on the seed heads.  Carol’s talk will present sedge information that describes the whole plant, including the often-interesting seed heads.  You will also learn the difference between grasses, sedges, and rushes.  In fact, by the end you just might be on your way to a “sedge-head.”

Ivory Sedge and Blue-stemmed Goldenrod

About Carol:

Carol Rice has lived on her 5-acre property for thirty years.  Initially, she and her husband were involved in restoring their oak woods, which were choked with buckthorn.  As the woods started to improve, they started replacing areas of turf grass with prairie gardens, (around 2005). They have continued to add species of grasses, sedges, forbs and trees over the years.  

Carol also has managed the Mentoring Program of the Wildflower Preservation and Propagation Committee since 2005, which has assisted about 160 homeowners establish native plant gardens.  She has been an active member of the WPPC for 28 years, and is also a member of Wild Ones, Citizens for Conservation, and Chicago Living Corridors.

Featured image: Carex sprengelli (Long-beaked Sedge)

 

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